Spring 2021 Exhibitions

Spring 2021 Exhibitions

Ongoing Matter

February 5 through March 12

A multi-platform, traveling collection of new poster designs that mobilizes political engagement, Ongoing Matter encourages civic engagement with the Report On The Investigation Into Russian Interference In The 2016 Presidential Election, or, as it is more colloquially known, the Mueller Report.

More about Ongoing Matter

Photographic Occurrences

February 5 through March 12

Featuring the work of over twenty artists, Photographic Occurrences highlights the history of Fine Art photographic experimentation at IU Bloomington. The exhibition centers on Henry Holmes Smith, who taught photography at IU from 1947-1977, founding one of the first graduate programs in photography in the world.

More about Photographic Occurrences

Virtual Opening Reception: February 5, 2021

Description of the video:

00:10
hello
00:10
i'm ed dallas camantelli associate vice
00:12
provost for the arts and humanities at
00:14
iu bloomington
00:16
and i am live streaming tonight from the
00:18
grand hall
00:19
of the brand new cook center for public
00:22
arts and humanities
00:23
i couldn't be prouder to be here tonight
00:25
and i'm grateful for all of you for
00:27
joining me
00:28
uh this evening this is our very first
00:30
event at the cook
00:31
center um and uh i'm kind of floored
00:34
that we're here
00:35
uh and i'm amazed and uh proud of all
00:38
the support that we've received
00:39
uh in putting this together um i'm gonna
00:42
say a little bit about the cook center
00:44
and its mission and what we plan to do
00:46
over the next year and then we'll be
00:47
talking about the two exciting exhibits
00:49
that are
00:49
opening this tuesday in our space
00:53
the arts and humanities council was
00:55
founded five years ago
00:57
and we began our work with a campus
00:59
survey and an asset map of our resources
01:02
and we immediately identified a
01:04
significant need for
01:06
a centralized campus center for arts and
01:08
humanities
01:09
we were hoping uh to find a space
01:12
at which we could focus all our amazing
01:14
work and our resources in the arts and
01:15
humanities
01:16
and we also wanted to identify a space
01:18
that could connect us with the thriving
01:20
uh downtown cultural scene in
01:22
bloomington indiana
01:23
we also wanted a beautiful space for
01:26
which we can celebrate and showcase the
01:27
arts and humanities
01:29
we found one in maxwell hall a gorgeous
01:32
building
01:32
from 1890 we spent the last year and a
01:34
half renovating it
01:36
and i'm sitting in here today it's a
01:38
wonderful time
01:39
to be in the arts and humanities at
01:41
indiana university
01:42
the project was funded by a grant from
01:44
the national endowment for the
01:46
humanities
01:47
an infrastructure grant as well as a
01:48
very generous gift which i'll discuss
01:50
in a moment we've been describing uh the
01:53
cook center at maxwell hall
01:54
as both a hub and a hearth it's a hub
01:57
because it brings together for the first
01:59
time
02:00
some of our most forward-thinking and
02:01
public-facing
02:03
units in arts and humanities for the
02:05
first time the arts and humanities
02:06
council has established offices
02:08
alongside the college arts and
02:10
humanities institute traditional arts
02:12
indiana
02:13
the center for royal engagement iu core
02:15
and
02:16
platform and arts and humanities
02:18
research center we're all working in
02:20
this building together from here on out
02:22
and i think the co-location is going to
02:24
be incredible
02:26
it's described as a hearth because this
02:28
is a place for celebrating arts and
02:30
humanities on campus
02:31
it's a gorgeous place it's a wonderful
02:35
beautiful place for receptions for
02:37
lectures
02:38
for conferences exhibits and
02:40
performances
02:41
it's a place where we like to show off
02:43
what we do here
02:44
it's a great place for fundraising as
02:46
well department gatherings
02:48
job candidate visits and all sorts of
02:50
things that we might need to do in our
02:51
work here in the arts and humanities
02:53
at the same time the cook center is a
02:55
bridge it's located just a few hundred
02:58
yards from downtown bloomington
03:00
and it's designed to connect with the
03:01
community and the downtown arts and
03:03
culture scene
03:04
we're working on a slew of new public
03:06
arts and humanities program for the
03:07
space
03:08
we're also talking with the city of
03:09
bloomington the arts commission
03:11
the bead district as well as visit
03:13
bloomington on new programs
03:14
we'll be participating in the city's art
03:16
walk and art exchange
03:18
and artist sca and a number of other
03:20
great programs
03:21
to connect campus artists and thinkers
03:23
to downtown artisan thinkers
03:25
and then finally cook center is a dynamo
03:27
it's a research dynamo
03:29
it's a place where we'll be generating
03:30
real work in the arts and humanities
03:32
new exhibits new scholarship all
03:34
throughout the annual calendar
03:37
the cook center is housing a new book
03:39
lab which is dedicated to the history of
03:41
the book and bookmaking
03:42
it also has new office spaces for
03:44
visiting scholars and artists in the
03:46
arts and humanities it's going to be a
03:48
thriving place
03:49
as as we begin to get up and running
03:51
over the next few months
03:53
i'll just say a couple things about the
03:54
features of the building uh it contains
03:56
a welcome center
03:57
a grand hall which i'm in now that sees
03:59
125 people for lectures and large
04:01
exhibits
04:02
a process gallery at which you can see
04:04
the entire creative process
04:06
from artistic conception all the way to
04:08
exhibiting it has an entire humanities
04:11
conference wing
04:12
with two seminar rooms eight breakout
04:14
rooms and offices for visiting scholars
04:16
it contains a kitchen and full catering
04:18
amenities as well as a courtyard
04:20
where we can host outdoor events it's
04:23
such a showpiece for us and this is a
04:25
historic change in our campus landscape
04:27
it also contains many offices for our
04:29
student interns and our student guild
04:31
which will be launching this semester
04:33
providing hundreds of opportunities in
04:35
public arts and humanities
04:36
for undergraduates and graduate students
04:38
here at iu the building is here to be
04:41
used it's for our a
04:42
h community i encourage you all to reach
04:45
out to me about the building to stop by
04:47
for a tour this semester
04:49
to come see the exhibits to talk about
04:50
the amenities it's here to be used
04:53
and i want to make it as open as
04:54
possible so please con contact me
04:57
directly
04:58
if you have any interest in doing so
04:59
make good use of it
05:01
throughout this semester it's open for
05:03
tours for sure as well as class
05:05
visits in april we'll be opening up the
05:07
scheduling process to faculty and
05:08
students
05:09
and we'll be having open space for
05:12
the summer and next fall as well
05:15
everything here is
05:16
is governed by covid safety protocols
05:18
will be open during the week from
05:20
tuesday to friday with special late
05:21
night hours on thursday
05:23
but you can expect the standard safety
05:25
protocols to be in place
05:28
with that i just want to say that
05:29
tonight we are opening
05:31
two incredibly exciting and timely
05:33
exhibits
05:34
they're timely in a number of ways i'm
05:37
so happy that this is a space for
05:38
celebrating our faculty and their work
05:41
and in these exhibits you can see dozens
05:43
of pieces by our iu faculty
05:45
especially from the school of art and i
05:47
encourage you to come and you'll be
05:48
surprised
05:49
at the amazing work on display here it's
05:51
also timely in the sense that we've been
05:54
sitting at home for a year
05:55
awash in images in media images in
05:58
political images
06:00
and both these works focus on the visual
06:02
and
06:03
focus on the image made tangible the
06:06
image made concrete
06:08
this is wonderful work that you hear a
06:09
lot about tonight but i assure you these
06:11
are images that disrupt that challenge
06:13
that inspire
06:14
these are images that meant are meant to
06:16
be seen in the flesh and i hope you can
06:18
come out and join us here at the space
06:20
it's a wonderful exhibit two exhibits
06:23
bright
06:23
fun mysterious and surprising at every
06:25
turn it's a real antidote to the end
06:27
home blues right now
06:29
i'd love to see you at the at the cook
06:31
center sometime
06:32
soon the last couple of days i've been
06:35
here with the staff
06:36
i cannot tell you how inspired i am by
06:38
the passion and the commitment that my
06:40
colleagues have displayed
06:41
in getting the center ready and putting
06:43
this work
06:44
out for you i'd like to thank a number
06:47
of people just quickly of course the
06:48
co-curators here sarah martin and anne
06:51
berry
06:51
as well as james nakagawa and david
06:53
andrick it's been a pleasure to work
06:55
with them
06:56
our exhibit coordinators betsy stearett
06:58
and linda tien from the gruenwald
06:59
gallery
07:00
and their fabulous team jesse lloyd ryan
07:02
farley and zach
07:04
kaufman we had a number of generous
07:06
loans for these two exhibits i'd just
07:07
like to thank especially martha and
07:09
david moore
07:10
uh for their contribution and of course
07:12
in putting the cook center together
07:14
i have to thank courtney payne michelle
07:16
buckland and adam tease at
07:18
capital planning and facilities and i
07:20
want to send a special thanks
07:21
and shout out to gerard panacoke our
07:23
program and operations coordinator
07:25
he's done the yeoman's work in getting
07:27
the center into shape and it's a marvel
07:29
to behold and a lot of that is
07:30
is due to gerard's work over the last
07:32
few months um
07:34
i also would like to thank president
07:35
michael mcrobbie for his generous
07:37
and broad-minded support for arts and
07:38
humanities on this campus
07:40
as well as provost lauren rebel a lot of
07:42
the cook center
07:44
and what you will find inside of it is
07:46
part of lauren's vision
07:47
and she's worked very closely with us at
07:49
the arts and humanities council
07:51
on the plans for the center along with
07:53
plans for first thursdays
07:54
the grand faloon and other campus
07:56
favorites she's worked
07:58
closely with us on grants on fundraising
08:00
and i'm planning
08:01
the space that i'm in today on this
08:04
momentous occasion though i would most
08:06
like to recognize the tremendous
08:07
generosity of gail cook
08:09
without whom this evening would not be
08:11
possible at all
08:12
as many of you know mrs cook is an iu
08:14
alumna she's an artist she's an
08:16
entrepreneur
08:17
a historic preservationist and a
08:19
philanthropist
08:20
who takes amazingly great pride in
08:23
supporting her community
08:24
not just bloomington but throughout the
08:26
state of indiana
08:28
along with the neh mrs cook has provided
08:30
us with the inspiration
08:31
and the support necessary to build this
08:34
campus center
08:35
for humanities research creative
08:37
activity and community engagement
08:39
thanks to her gift maxwell hall has now
08:41
been transformed into the gale karch
08:43
cook
08:43
center for public arts and humanities a
08:46
space that will serve our campus and
08:48
community for generations to come
08:50
thank you mrs cook i know gail might be
08:53
watching with us
08:54
today so please send as many hearts and
08:55
claps as you can in the feed for her
08:57
um we're going to have a formal
08:58
dedication of the building on april 8th
09:01
this semester
09:01
and then we'll have a grand opening and
09:03
a dance party at the start of the fall
09:05
semester
09:05
so i'm looking forward to seeing more of
09:07
you then at this point i'm going to turn
09:09
the program over
09:10
to betsy steart my good friend and
09:13
director of the greenworld gallery
09:15
thanks betsy hi welcome
09:18
um thank you ed that that was a pretty
09:20
hard to
09:21
pretty hard to follow up on that that
09:23
was that was an awesome introduction
09:25
um i just want to say that um i'm really
09:28
really happy to be here
09:29
as well uh to introduce our two
09:32
exhibitions that we've had the fortunate
09:34
uh benefit of being part of uh for the
09:37
first uh
09:38
shows at the gail cook um center
09:42
we're very pleased to be um that ed and
09:45
his folks have trusted us with working
09:47
with the curators for these exhibits and
09:50
um me and the grundwald team which
09:53
i have to include linda tien on on this
09:56
um hard work that we've
09:57
put into making sure that these exhibits
10:00
have uh
10:01
become a success and i think once you
10:03
see
10:04
them you'll see that they are um they're
10:06
beautiful shows
10:07
um so as ed mentioned um
10:11
we um we as part of the school of art
10:14
architecture and design have been
10:16
involved in this
10:16
and and we are focusing on uh exhibiting
10:19
uh
10:20
works by either by iu faculty or curated
10:23
by iu faculty
10:24
and um in these two exhibitions um
10:27
we will see some wonderful uh i guess a
10:31
variety of works uh on display
10:33
the first show that i want to talk about
10:36
today i'm going to do
10:37
just do a brief introduction then i'll
10:38
hand it over to sarah edmonds martin
10:41
and ann berry um who have worked
10:43
together on this show called
10:47
ongoing matter and sarah is an assistant
10:51
professor of graphic design here at iu
10:54
and ann h berry is an assistant
10:56
professor of graphic design at cleveland
10:57
state university
10:59
they've organized and created and
11:01
produced this timely
11:02
and provocative exhibition of striking
11:04
posters
11:05
in the show ongoing matter which is now
11:08
in the grand hall as you saw
11:09
behind ed there the exhibit contains
11:13
over 30 posters
11:15
that encourage engagement with the
11:17
report on the
11:18
investigation into russian interference
11:21
in the
11:22
2016 presidential election better known
11:26
as the mueller report
11:28
the designers of these posters are using
11:29
the art of communication to reveal
11:31
persuade and propel citizens to action
11:34
this is a non-partisan project and is
11:37
concerned with preserving democracy
11:39
protecting integrity and sharing
11:41
knowledge
11:42
let me introduce sarah martin and ann
11:45
berry great
11:48
thank you thank you so much thank you so
11:51
much betsy
11:52
um sarah and i would first like to
11:54
express our thanks and appreciation to
11:56
everyone at indiana university ongoing
11:59
matters partially supported by the
12:01
indiana university's arts and
12:03
humanities council the new frontiers in
12:05
the arts and humanities program
12:07
and the office of the vice provost of
12:09
research through the grant and aid
12:11
program
12:12
and of course a special thanks to ed
12:14
komentalli and the arts and humanities
12:16
staff
12:16
um betsy stearett and linda tien of the
12:19
grunwald gallery
12:20
lindy graves the shop assistant and all
12:23
the staff that helped
12:24
helped bring the show to iu it takes a
12:27
village sometimes which is
12:29
is great um so i usually begin talks
12:32
about ongoing matter
12:33
that the full title is ongoing matter
12:36
democracy design and
12:37
the mueller report by acknowledging my
12:40
father leroy berry jr
12:42
not simply be because we're related but
12:44
because he
12:45
is in his own right as an attorney and
12:48
retired history and political science
12:49
professor
12:51
somebody who is a voracious learner an
12:53
academic
12:54
and like me an educator um i also want
12:57
to mention on a side note that he
12:59
he happens to be an iu law school alum
13:02
so
13:02
i have um some fond memories of living
13:05
in bloomington many
13:06
many years ago um but at any event my
13:09
siblings and i learned early on that
13:11
politics played an important role in our
13:13
lives
13:14
if not for the 1967 loving versus
13:17
virginia supreme court case
13:19
my parents would not have been able to
13:21
legally marry
13:22
and if not for brown versus board of
13:25
education
13:26
we might not be here together having
13:28
this
13:29
this conversation today um
13:32
and certainly there are people who may
13:34
not see themselves as political
13:36
they may not see themselves as
13:37
politically active or even interested in
13:39
politics
13:41
um and yet politics and design share an
13:44
important characteristic
13:45
um i certainly believe that on a
13:47
fundamental level politics like design
13:50
is
13:50
is everywhere and like design politics
13:53
touches
13:53
everything and is part of our everyday
13:55
lives whether or not we
13:57
realize it or even see these political
13:59
systems at work
14:01
so a bit later sarah will talk further
14:03
about some of these connections between
14:05
design and politics
14:07
primarily through the historical lens of
14:09
political poster design
14:12
but to get us started i'm going to take
14:13
us back to 2019 which probably
14:16
feels like many many years ago now um
14:18
but
14:19
in the the summer of 2019 i started
14:21
reading the mueller report
14:23
which i downloaded directly from the the
14:25
department of justice
14:27
um website um like many other people
14:30
were doing it
14:31
at the same time and i was shocked um
14:34
though the document is the very
14:36
definition of
14:38
of what we might call a governmental
14:40
artifact uh so you have the 12 point
14:42
times new roman font and you've got this
14:46
uh huge lengthy document that is 448
14:49
pages long
14:51
which again was documenting the
14:53
investigation into the the russian
14:55
interference in the 2016 president
14:57
presidential election um but yet it
14:59
reads like a spy novel
15:02
so uh from stolen documents
15:05
and russian hacking to the russian
15:07
internet research
15:08
agency's active measures social media
15:10
campaign
15:11
um it's it's all a mouthful but there's
15:13
a level at which it
15:14
is i think difficult um to fully
15:18
comprehend that all of this happened to
15:20
us
15:21
um in the united states and has resulted
15:24
in our
15:25
collective loss of faith in the
15:27
electoral process
15:28
and and free and fair elections and i
15:30
think um
15:31
we see this continuing to play out even
15:33
even now
15:35
um so i after reading this report
15:38
i reached out to design friends and
15:40
collaborators and it turned out that
15:41
they were equally shocked
15:43
about the events surrounding the 2016
15:46
election
15:47
so um though our our perspectives and
15:50
and motivations uh differ i think it's
15:53
fair to say that we are
15:55
united by an awareness of how our lives
15:57
are connected to politics i think that's
15:58
kind of where we all
16:00
started um and for us the mueller report
16:03
is a design
16:04
problem that is worth investigating
16:07
so one of our primary questions has been
16:10
how do we make the report
16:11
itself more accessible or
16:14
easily understood by a wider audience
16:18
so the poster exhibition is really just
16:20
one part of this larger
16:22
question of trying to figure out ways of
16:26
of overcoming communication barriers
16:28
particularly when the health of american
16:31
democracy is at stake
16:33
as much as the port as much as the
16:35
report was
16:36
meant to be uh publicized and easily
16:39
accessible
16:40
um it's still there's still a lot of
16:42
people who haven't read it
16:44
um so as i mentioned earlier for me
16:47
politics is very personal much of my
16:50
identity and perspectives have been
16:52
forged by where i fit into political
16:54
history
16:55
but i think it's also fair to say that
16:57
the the same thing is true for sarah
16:59
and for our project uh collaborative
17:01
collaborators
17:02
so with with that bit of an introduction
17:05
i will
17:06
uh turn things over to to you sarah
17:09
thanks ann um so i'll kind of start here
17:12
with this quote
17:12
um throughout time posters stand as an
17:15
enduring reflection
17:16
of the moment they were designed and
17:18
this by rick valencia the
17:19
creative director and i believe
17:21
co-founder of thirst a design studio
17:23
and um he he wrote that in the in
17:26
graphi's publication
17:28
of the 2020 um poster annual it's an
17:30
international collection of the best
17:32
posters of that year 2020.
17:34
um and despite predictions that printed
17:36
materials would perish in the digital
17:38
age
17:39
the printed political poster in
17:41
particular has
17:42
not disappeared elizabeth resnick
17:46
um curator of such comprehensive poster
17:48
exhibits as the art of the poster or the
17:50
graphic imperative
17:51
international posters of peace social
17:53
justice and the environment
17:55
and of course graphic advocacy
17:56
international posters of the digital age
17:58
who actually um
18:00
when anne and i were starting this
18:01
project we reached out to and
18:03
she gave it the thumbs up in green light
18:05
which was kind of like
18:06
gandhi telling you you're doing a good
18:08
job uh
18:10
she states that the poster in all of its
18:12
forms has persisted as a vehicle for the
18:14
public dissemination
18:15
of ideas information and opinion
18:18
um and you know we in doing research for
18:22
this project we didn't just look
18:24
at the contemporary moment but we we
18:26
looked back at how art and design
18:28
and politics have always been bad
18:30
fellows back in 1972
18:32
andy warhol was commissioned to create a
18:34
poster for the dnc the presidential
18:36
um the dnc their uh kind of propaganda
18:39
for the presidential candidate george
18:41
mcgovern
18:42
and what warhol actually made didn't
18:43
depict mcgovern at all
18:45
instead the vote mcgovern poster showed
18:48
this sickly snake green skinned
18:50
diabolical uh version of richard nixon
18:54
and just
18:55
like in warhol's marilyn monroe or mao
18:57
series which you might be more familiar
18:59
with
19:00
not many people know that ander walhall
19:02
did political design
19:04
in this kind of overt way um
19:07
warhol sourced popular media approved
19:10
portraits of nixon to use as his base
19:13
um he uses color alterations
19:16
and transforms the simple image in order
19:19
to communicate something deeply
19:20
disturbing
19:21
and powerful and then of course um many
19:24
people
19:25
know of the 2008 uh shepherd fairy
19:28
design
19:29
which really launched shepard ferry from
19:31
his obey brand into
19:32
kind of the sphere of social justice um
19:35
poster design and he continues to create
19:38
um
19:39
accessible poster designs that people
19:41
can download and print out and they are
19:43
meant to kind of have
19:45
for free to go use in the streets and so
19:47
again
19:48
ann and i really started looking at this
19:50
history of poster design
19:52
in conjunction with accessibility and
19:54
communicating clear messaging
19:56
when it comes to something as important
19:58
as the mueller report
20:00
which as a design object is a complete
20:02
failure
20:03
it's 448 something pages
20:06
as anne mentioned times new roman
20:09
legalese
20:10
it's redacted to all get out
20:14
um so there are giant chunks actually
20:16
whole entire pages are just blacked out
20:19
with this phrasing harm to ongoing
20:21
matter which as you might imagine
20:22
inspired the project title the more that
20:26
we
20:26
started digging in and reading this
20:27
report and i think both of us read it
20:29
more times we want to admit in order to
20:32
kind of start doing
20:34
some uh investigation into what needed
20:36
what were the key issues that as
20:38
designers we felt
20:39
um we were responsible for bringing uh
20:42
to
20:42
a more public audience so it's like i
20:44
said is 448 pages
20:47
um and you can kind of see i went
20:49
through and
20:50
analyzed 11 of it at the time of its
20:52
initial publication
20:54
was redacted so you couldn't read 11
20:57
of this document also there were over a
21:00
thousand footnotes um so not only was
21:02
the general body copy of the text really
21:05
difficult to dig into
21:06
but in order to get a full picture you'd
21:08
have to go read the footnotes
21:10
and sometimes the more salacious kind of
21:12
details of the of the investigation were
21:14
actually buried in the footnotes again
21:16
sort of a failure of accessibility and
21:19
design
21:20
and as victor papanek has said um and
21:22
one of
21:23
again he's one of the inspirations for
21:24
this project too in some ways
21:26
the only important thing about design is
21:28
the way that it serves its community
21:30
right um so although what you see in the
21:33
exhibit and what you saw earlier and
21:35
some of the examples um in our slideshow
21:38
were beautiful poster poster designs
21:41
a lot of our work was also just parsing
21:43
this document
21:44
organizing this document um and deciding
21:48
what is what were the most important
21:49
things to draw a viewer's attention to
21:52
and so this was a timeline that um ann
21:54
started designing and we added
21:56
the content to as we were working just
21:58
for ourselves
21:59
to kind of organize all of the um the
22:02
facts
22:02
the timeline and as we were making this
22:04
we were like why did the us government
22:06
not create something like this
22:08
um and so we ended up anne actually
22:11
ended up designing
22:12
this into a poster that's in the show as
22:14
well to help ground
22:15
all of the other visual components of
22:18
the exhibit
22:19
um all of the posters quote verbatim
22:22
from the report so there is um again
22:25
going back
22:26
to the idea of accessibility there is a
22:28
level at which we want
22:30
to encourage folks to read the report
22:32
themselves or at least read the language
22:34
verbatim
22:34
um because it does like ann said read
22:36
like a spy novel um so every
22:38
all the type that you will see in the
22:40
show is verbatim from the text
22:42
um and with that i uh i encourage you to
22:45
um
22:46
if you if this has inspired you if you
22:47
would like to be involved
22:49
we do think that this show will travel
22:51
to another venue in 2022
22:53
so um we are open to more participation
22:56
participation from designers and artists
22:59
alike so please reach out to us
23:02
i would just add a on a quick note um we
23:05
we also encourage you to visit the
23:06
website
23:07
because you will be able to see the
23:08
entire poster collection there as well
23:17
thank you that's fantastic
23:20
what a wonderful scary show
23:26
it was great um i wanted to talk a
23:28
little bit about our other exhibit
23:29
um briefly before i introduce our other
23:32
curators and artists
23:33
um photographic occurrences
23:37
uh which is taking place in the process
23:39
gallery which you see behind me
23:41
um is the curatorial project of faculty
23:44
curators and artists
23:46
osama james nakagawa and david andrick
23:49
and contains the work of artist
23:50
photographers who have maintained the
23:52
lineage and legacy
23:54
of photographic studies at indiana
23:56
university first in the henry radford
23:58
hopes school of fine arts
23:59
and now in the eskenazi school of art
24:01
architecture and design the exhibit
24:04
highlights work by the founder of the
24:06
photography program
24:07
henry holmes smith who taught
24:08
photography at iu
24:10
from 1947 to 77
24:13
as an avid experimenter in the dark room
24:17
he broke
24:18
new ground in the creation of cameraless
24:20
photographic images
24:21
photographic occurrences celebrate
24:23
smith's legacy of experimentation at
24:25
indiana university by exhibiting smith's
24:27
photographs
24:28
the work of the star students jerry
24:30
ulsman betty hahn and robert victor
24:33
and photographs by current and um and
24:35
emeritus eskenazi school faculty
24:38
and ium ffa alumni additionally a
24:41
beautiful daguerreotype by takashi arai
24:43
as it is on display
24:45
in the show which you must go see um
24:48
it's the result of a planned artist
24:50
visit that didn't take place
24:52
due to the current pandemic and this is
24:54
a beautiful piece that's um
24:56
it's a must see the exhibition
24:59
highlights the varied and experimental
25:01
nature of photography at iu
25:03
and it's looked to important past and
25:05
future traditional
25:07
and experimental photographic processes
25:10
um let me introduce uh james nakagawa
25:13
and david andrick
25:18
uh hi everybody uh
25:22
our show is not as organized uh it will
25:25
uh
25:26
how this uh exhibition came together
25:30
because i kind of reacted to the
25:33
unfortunate
25:33
situation with pandemic and then
25:37
cancellation of takashi
25:39
arise billboard project that we got
25:41
funded by ovpr
25:45
and from that quickly i was talking to
25:48
ed
25:49
about how to make this unfortunate
25:52
situation
25:53
positive energy and then
25:56
it was a kind of stretch from takashi's
25:59
contemporary
26:00
digestive to uh connect to
26:04
connect to our founder henry von smith
26:06
but once i
26:07
did that started to make sense because
26:09
daguerreotype is the oldest
26:11
process uh photograph photographic
26:14
process
26:15
invented in 1839 and then
26:18
henry holmes smith was known as very
26:21
experimental
26:22
abstract photographers and so many uh
26:25
people came out from under his
26:28
uh uh uh teaching and
26:31
uh jerry wilsman and also
26:34
uh betty han who is one of the
26:38
important uh female uh
26:41
photographer in united states and
26:44
she was
26:47
putting in a photographic image onto
26:50
fabric and then
26:51
doing the embroidery back in 1960s and
26:55
50s and 60s
26:56
so so uh now
27:00
with digital technology our students are
27:03
you know creating a digital print on the
27:07
fabric and then
27:08
stitching together and all that kind of
27:10
stuff is happening so it's
27:12
kind of henry holmes smith's
27:14
experimental dna
27:17
is still going on
27:20
with this uh our program so i was
27:22
talking to david
27:24
how can we put this together and david
27:28
is another uh non-uh
27:33
lens-based abstract camigram
27:37
that he he creates and i think it was
27:40
great to work with him and then
27:43
get this kind of thread together
27:47
for over how many years geez
27:52
since 47 so it is for a long time
27:55
okay david go ahead okay um
27:58
so i got my undergraduate degree at the
28:01
university of new mexico which is where
28:03
betty han was
28:04
faculty for i would think most of her
28:07
career i'm not entirely
28:08
positive about that and it actually
28:11
turns out that
28:12
the woman who babysat for our block had
28:15
been one of betty's
28:16
students so as like a four-year-old i
28:17
was doing art projects that had been
28:19
inspired by betty's
28:21
teachings um and unm itself was fairly
28:24
experimental
28:26
between tom barrow and patrick nagatani
28:30
all sorts of wacky things were happening
28:32
in the chemical darkroom
28:34
uh we're pretty early to pick up
28:35
computers and really
28:38
like using the medium to communicate as
28:40
opposed to
28:43
should depict uh so like
28:47
social documentary was not the name of
28:49
the game it was
28:50
making actual uh physical prints
28:54
physical artworks that needed to be
28:55
experiment experienced
28:58
in person in front of them and that's
28:59
what we have in this exhibit
29:01
whether you're talking about rolling
29:04
rickets
29:05
pieces which are indigo dyed fabric that
29:08
have been bleached by the sun
29:09
over 280 days or you're talking about
29:12
morgan stevenson's print on fabric that
29:15
is a soft sculpture
29:16
that's about 10 feet tall
29:19
betty hans cyanotype that you can see
29:22
there that she's
29:22
drawn on it's not in this shot but just
29:25
to the
29:27
in the just to the right of that picture
29:29
is where uh takashi's daguerreotype
29:31
is set up and that actually requires you
29:33
to do
29:34
a sort of a move like this to see it
29:36
because the daguerreotype is made on us
29:38
very highly polished plate of silver
29:42
and so getting and that's such a
29:44
different thing than
29:45
looking at photographs on a screen
29:48
especially a five inch screen that fits
29:49
in your pocket
29:51
which is how most of us interact with
29:52
photographs these days
29:55
so i'll throw it back to you james well
29:58
yeah and then
29:59
also faculty members uh we wanted to
30:02
i was talking to ed about the
30:04
celebrating faculty's work
30:07
from iu and then also uh the
30:10
graduate students work and i thought it
30:13
was like a perfect
30:14
perfect way to start to
30:18
have exhibition at the space and then ed
30:21
got excited about our
30:25
uh idea and all i did
30:28
was start emailing these people
30:32
uh but david and i we kind of created
30:35
this
30:35
rule that you cannot have straight
30:39
silver prints or straight digital prints
30:43
it has to have some kind of tactile
30:47
quality to the photographic object
30:50
and then also uh representation
30:54
photographic images all the way to
30:56
abstraction because of henry home smith
30:58
was doing abstraction
31:00
and then i'm known for doing a hyper
31:02
real
31:04
digital print like what you see in the
31:06
back
31:07
but david said you cannot put those in
31:10
so
31:11
luckily i made another work
31:15
with kind of alternative process with
31:18
cyanotype
31:19
and soil print in okinawa using a salt
31:22
water ocean water and creating these
31:25
prints
31:26
so so it's very experimental
31:31
throughout these uh show my dear
31:34
colleague uh colleague liz claffey
31:37
elizabeth claffy's work
31:39
uh she is creating this kind of
31:42
3d uh sculptural work with cyanotype
31:46
and and page pages of the book
31:51
and uh yes so
31:54
you know yes former students work and
31:58
that
31:59
david and i we just we were conscious
32:01
about the
32:02
mfa students who didn't get to show
32:04
their mfa
32:05
thesis show last may and we selected
32:09
from some of them not all of them but
32:12
some of them
32:12
are to exhibit this exhibition
32:16
so uh like seth cook's work is very
32:20
physical
32:21
he he invented the process to
32:24
transfer photographic images
32:28
digital photographic images onto canvas
32:31
or sometimes board wood board and then
32:36
squeegee and create a
32:39
very tactile object like uh
32:43
but still you can see representational
32:45
image or photograph
32:46
somewhere in it and uh yeah
32:50
the role and records work is indigo
32:53
it's no chemical it's you know it's
32:55
natural
32:57
and organic but you know he masked
33:00
uh the fabric that the indigo died and
33:04
then
33:04
opened up a certain area and exposed it
33:07
for a long time so became
33:09
kind of white and betsy's work here
33:14
uh with a palladium print
33:18
yeah and uh ahmed's work is a
33:22
combination digital
33:24
print and cyanotype but it's again this
33:27
is very physical
33:28
physical surface right david
33:32
yeah i'm not sure how well it shows in
33:34
the screen but
33:36
this the cyanotype is actually
33:38
physically pulled away to reveal the
33:40
grayscale inkjet behind it so this is
33:43
almost a relief sculpture
33:45
and a lot of these pieces you can see
33:46
there morgan's piece
33:48
um do exist in multiple in three
33:50
dimensions
33:51
and you can move around them
33:54
see the attention to the way they've
33:56
been stitched the way they've been
33:58
thoughts about materiality this fabric
34:01
versus that fabric
34:04
the paper that the artists pick is very
34:06
very intentional
34:08
if you see in person james's piece that
34:10
we saw a little bit earlier has a rough
34:12
texture
34:13
compared to june's piece which is a very
34:16
smooth
34:17
surface there right in the middle um
34:20
those two pieces together and across
34:23
from that
34:24
is a lithograph which has its own
34:26
surface and tactile nature
34:28
as well as the cyanotype which again a
34:30
very specific paper was chosen
34:32
to do that so it also shows the
34:35
tremendous
34:36
range of ways you can make a photograph
34:39
if you
34:40
go back all the way to 1839 and
34:43
processes that have existed then
34:45
and these are all processes that henry
34:46
holmes smith
34:48
helped resurrect and in fact betty hahn
34:51
is really well known
34:52
for breathing life back into thin
34:55
techniques processes that had not been
34:58
used for 70 years or more when she got
35:00
back
35:01
into them and helped popularize them so
35:04
this has been the undercurrent of our
35:05
program and our legacy
35:08
at iu yeah and then also you know
35:11
this came out of pandemic
35:14
we were locked in we couldn't get uh
35:17
takashi to come
35:18
to bloomington and uh
35:22
you know we were staring at the computer
35:24
screen
35:25
all the time and
35:29
gotta do something physical and the
35:32
photography
35:33
is not on the screen those are digital
35:36
imaging
35:37
so i mean having this show
35:40
i know you can look at it like this but
35:44
you have to go to this place
35:47
click center and please experience
35:51
photography not just looking at
35:55
the screen photography is object
36:00
so please come see it and then enjoy
36:05
and then also i would like to thank some
36:09
people
36:10
i mean first i want to thank ed because
36:14
the whole thing didn't work out that was
36:16
on the march
36:18
about bringing in takashi for the uh
36:21
public art
36:22
project but then quickly he
36:25
supported me to do this show and then
36:28
i'm glad
36:29
we are doing you know we did the show
36:32
and then
36:32
also uh lauren richmond for her
36:35
insightful
36:36
essay and sarah
36:39
martin created this incredible
36:42
book
36:51
and uh well again david david
36:54
and martha moore and jeff wallin
36:58
and arthur liu uh they uh
37:01
uh for learning artwork from
37:05
personal collection and then also
37:07
takashi arrives gary
37:09
v pgi my gary too from tokyo
37:12
sending those precious uh uh
37:15
daguerreotype
37:16
uh from all the way from tokyo
37:20
and david for the artist
37:24
right thank you for sending us
37:28
all our uh all the work uh all over the
37:31
place
37:32
uh without you guys we couldn't do this
37:35
you know very interesting show so thank
37:38
you very much
37:38
and betsy and linda thank you for
37:42
uh installing the show uh
37:46
you know we needed your professional
37:48
touch and then
37:49
thank you very much thanks
37:52
it was fun um i also want to thank ed
37:56
because uh without ed um i'm not really
38:00
sure
38:01
uh not only would this all not be
38:03
happening but
38:05
so many things on this campus would not
38:06
be happening uh
38:09
i know from the grundwald from our
38:11
perspective
38:12
we i'm eternally grateful to ed
38:15
for his support and you know
38:19
i guess enthusiasm to work with us and
38:21
everything else i mean it's been
38:23
fantastic so i want to really mention
38:25
that
38:26
um also um
38:29
i would like to open it up to questions
38:32
um or
38:33
would our panelists like to talk to each
38:35
other about anything
38:37
um that's also an option um
38:40
we do want we do have uh a one question
38:43
but
38:44
um would any of the panelists like to
38:48
say anything else before we go into
38:49
questions
38:52
no okay well we do have a question
38:56
um it is about ongoing
39:00
matter and uh this
39:03
person would like to know has anybody
39:06
ever
39:06
seen anything done with the mueller
39:09
report before
39:11
in this way has it ever been done
39:13
anywhere else because i don't
39:15
i know i haven't seen it but how about
39:17
you two designers
39:19
well i haven't um i know that i mean
39:23
again like before we even uh
39:26
really got the the project underway i
39:28
think we were well at least i was sort
39:29
of looking at some
39:31
some some of the things that had been
39:32
done so um
39:34
through the project we've we've
39:36
encountered some things that are really
39:37
interesting so of course there are
39:39
podcasts
39:40
um of course there are books um law fair
39:43
blog in particular i i'm gonna
39:45
give a shout out to them wherever they
39:47
are they they did a series that isn't
39:49
the the mueller report verbatim but it
39:52
breaks down the key
39:53
pieces of the mueller report in a really
39:55
interesting way um
39:57
i think there were celebrities who were
39:59
reading or singing parts of the mueller
40:01
report so there there have been a
40:03
variety of ways in which i think people
40:04
have tried to
40:08
make it interesting um and accessible
40:11
but i don't think anyone has done it in
40:13
this particular way
40:15
yet no and there have been pushes
40:19
there have been so again over the course
40:21
of doing this project and starting to
40:23
see what else has been out
40:24
you know what else is out there um it's
40:27
not necessarily visual but it is the
40:29
functional side of design there
40:31
are groups that have taken up kind of
40:33
like this pro bono
40:35
um coding like re-encoding the report to
40:37
make it more functional
40:39
um we've kind of taken a much different
40:41
approach it's much more visual
40:43
and contemplative and um
40:46
reflective and of course uh you know uh
40:50
colorful uh so it's different but it's
40:53
inspiring to see um many approaches
40:56
because ultimately
40:57
we need all of those approaches in order
40:59
to solve a very big problem like nothing
41:01
nothing just ongoing matter cannot just
41:04
solve the problem of the mueller report
41:06
and government
41:07
report design but a bunch of creative
41:09
thinkers
41:10
coming up the problem creatively from
41:12
their area of expertise
41:13
you know might be able to affect some
41:16
kind of change
41:19
i think it's very clear from the show
41:21
i'm from looking at the posters how much
41:23
study
41:24
went into that report by you
41:28
you and the designers i mean that was
41:29
very clear that um
41:31
there was a lot of engagement there this
41:33
was not just a sort of a
41:35
quick um skim of the report so it's
41:38
pretty impressive
41:40
what you've accomplished i think and
41:42
also to make things that are
41:43
visually so compelling out of that
41:47
material
41:48
um i think it's amazing so
41:51
thank you thank you for saying that i
41:52
guess i'll also add too it's not as
41:54
though
41:55
yes there we went in depth with the
41:57
reading but it wasn't
41:58
easy reading either right it wasn't like
42:01
light reading
42:02
i mean there were definitely parts of it
42:04
that are
42:05
as i mentioned earlier shocking and just
42:07
crazy
42:08
um but it's it's very dense and
42:11
uh one of the things we've discovered is
42:14
that they're
42:14
you know i don't know what the
42:16
percentage is but there are many uh
42:18
lawmakers who still haven't read it
42:20
because they themselves were like
42:22
it's so long and it's very dense
42:25
so it's a problem
42:29
it's great um let me see
42:33
um i let's see
42:36
um i don't have any other questions from
42:39
the audience right now
42:40
but um if i i did want to bring up one
42:44
thing that
42:45
um i went to graduate school here at iu
42:47
as well in
42:48
the the 80s um way back in the day
42:51
before
42:52
many of you were born um sarah martin
42:54
reminded me
42:55
of that um anyway it was
42:59
it doesn't bother me it's all right um
43:01
but i just want to mention that um
43:02
early on in the 80s when uh jeff lolan
43:05
was here
43:06
uh teaching um he he actually
43:10
uh initiated quite a number of
43:13
alternative processes
43:14
activities uh for the students
43:18
and um and he he brought
43:21
james riley in who wrote the definitive
43:24
book on
43:26
album and salted paper prints um and so
43:29
that was a really uh
43:30
sort of an important moment i believe in
43:33
the program
43:34
because so many people were studying um
43:37
different alternative processes at that
43:39
time um so it was pretty exciting and
43:42
that was sort of
43:43
uh kind of i know i know it starts sort
43:47
of got rolling in the 70s
43:49
um but it was uh sort of the
43:52
first introduction i think after henry
43:54
homesmith um
43:56
laughed and then he went through the
43:58
digital and those are coming back right
44:00
now
44:01
you know the process is coming back and
44:04
the way i you know to do i mean
44:07
doing this show i started to think about
44:09
what is this dna
44:12
i mean home smith came he was kind of
44:14
crazy
44:15
uh alternative process and then
44:18
abstraction and he didn't use you know
44:20
lens
44:21
or camera sometimes but then he
44:25
hired reg heron from chicago id
44:28
right and he was more
44:31
probably conservative in terms of image
44:34
making but
44:35
he was crazy scientist comes to chemical
44:38
and then all that so so and then also
44:42
henry home smith was playing with
44:44
chemical
44:45
in a very intuitive way i would say so
44:49
you know he hired reg but then reg hired
44:52
jeff and then alternative process and
44:55
then
44:56
then then came to uh me i mean
44:59
jeff hired me because i was doing
45:00
digital so there's this kind of
45:03
strange i mean it's interesting
45:05
interesting i think thread
45:08
and now it's to you know liz is here and
45:10
she's making books and
45:12
you know physicality of the uh image so
45:16
there's some something's happy
45:20
don't you think it also has to do with
45:21
the way photography is perceived now
45:23
compared to what it was then
45:25
because i believe that um photography
45:28
has
45:28
made strides uh toward more contemporary
45:32
image making than maybe back in the 70s
45:36
uh
45:37
it was a little bit separated from the
45:38
art world in a sense it was
45:40
it was photography and it wasn't art 80s
45:45
made and huge print and then gursky
45:47
started making huge print
45:49
i mean but then what about those you
45:52
know
45:52
small prints that you know photography
45:54
used to make too
45:55
and then and also alternative process
45:58
all that so it's i think it's coming
46:00
back and digital made it
46:04
hyper real sharpness and we're still
46:08
seeking for 4k ak video too
46:11
right but then you know i think it's
46:15
half a shop you want to get
46:18
you know but then the problem is is it
46:20
becomes look
46:21
it starts to look commercial right um
46:25
yeah so um the handmade
46:28
is so important and i think that that
46:31
people are recognizing that more and
46:34
more
46:34
i mean they have been for a while but
46:37
that's so
46:38
critical and this shows a great example
46:40
of showing that
46:43
yeah content-wise everywhere
46:48
this i mean you know our show the uh you
46:51
know photographic occurrence is
46:52
content-wise it's kind of everywhere but
46:54
it's it's nice even though it's not
46:58
thematic it is in a way because so many
47:02
layers
47:03
came in to abstraction representation
47:07
you know historical process
47:11
you know all that so it's it's really
47:13
interesting the way it
47:14
came together intuitively
47:20
i have a another question for ann and
47:22
sarah
47:23
from the audience it is uh let's see do
47:26
you see any possibilities of this work
47:28
inspiring design curriculum in the
47:30
future
47:31
especially around civic engagement uh
47:34
politically engaged design
47:35
and what might that look like
47:39
well i think the short answer is yes in
47:42
fact
47:43
i mean i'm i'm an educator and so
47:45
naturally my mind goes to
47:47
curriculum and um what are ways that
47:50
i mean this project is of interest to me
47:52
obviously but
47:54
um how can i make if not the mueller
47:56
report
47:57
uh something similar interesting to my
47:59
students and sort of a
48:01
another design i guess problem or
48:02
challenge to address
48:04
with respect to um dense information and
48:08
making it more accessible to a wider
48:10
audience and and i
48:12
speaking for myself i would say i think
48:14
students often time
48:15
well i guess it just depends but
48:17
sometimes students don't necessarily see
48:19
themselves as
48:21
politically activated um
48:24
well maybe around maybe around election
48:26
time but but sometimes i think they see
48:28
themselves as apolitical
48:30
um and i you know this isn't really
48:34
political in the sense that we're trying
48:35
to get people excited about
48:37
a particular political party but i think
48:40
it's the larger goal of helping students
48:43
understand
48:43
um that they are impacted by things that
48:46
happen
48:47
they they are impacted by the mueller
48:49
report um
48:50
especially when we look at the methods
48:52
that um
48:53
the the russians were using to to
48:55
interfere
48:56
was through social media and many of our
48:58
students are using social media
49:00
so i think um with with respect to
49:03
curriculum specifically it's like
49:05
bridging some of these maybe perceived
49:07
gaps between
49:09
this dense boring document but it
49:12
actually relates to
49:13
the way our students are are interfacing
49:15
with each other in the world
49:18
yeah and i'll just add that it's you
49:20
know part of the teaching
49:22
uh one of the big core teaching moments
49:25
in design
49:26
is is explaining that nothing is neutral
49:28
whether that be helvetica
49:30
the typeface or times new roman that
49:32
they're steeped in the history and they
49:34
carry the weight of all of their former
49:35
usages
49:37
so is the documents that the government
49:40
put
49:40
put out you know that we we interviewed
49:43
and i interviewed uh
49:45
dr bernard fraga who used to be a
49:47
political scientist here for this
49:49
um for this project to kind of get his
49:51
perspective on whether we're kind of
49:52
trying to
49:53
tease out whether or not the document is
49:55
intentionally
49:56
poorly designed which is kind of a
49:58
loaded question but we were
50:00
investigating that and um i mean i think
50:03
the answer is sort of yes
50:04
like it's it's really not designed for
50:06
broad engagement it's not designed for
50:08
like the lay
50:09
civilian to pick up and read um because
50:12
having access to some of that
50:13
information could be potentially
50:15
dangerous
50:16
and um teaching our students that that
50:18
this is part of their civic
50:20
and democratic uh role in this country
50:23
um as well as designers who are we're
50:25
just communicators like effective
50:27
communicators
50:28
that it's really important for them to
50:29
take up that mantle you know it doesn't
50:31
mean they have to be a revolutionary out
50:33
in the street
50:34
but every piece of design that they
50:37
touch and put out into the world
50:39
is political it is it is it's part of
50:42
our responsibility as designers to be
50:44
very ethical in the kind of
50:46
communications that we deploy
50:48
so um we also i think it's a good moment
50:50
to maybe plug the
50:51
aiga poster show that's uh opening in
50:54
the commonwealth gallery
50:55
next week um which my colleague jenny
50:58
alchemy
50:59
helped courtney and has work in and that
51:02
brings together
51:02
student work from the bfa graphic design
51:04
program as well as
51:06
practicing graphic designers from all
51:08
over the country um so we
51:10
at iu we do engage students in um
51:13
in politics when it's appropriate and
51:16
the democratic the semester of arts and
51:18
humanities
51:19
across the college of arts and arts and
51:21
sciences
51:22
uh was um democracy i believe
51:25
last last year so we engaged with it
51:29
in our classes that way but ann and i
51:31
have also had discussions about
51:32
how to bring this particular project
51:34
ongoing matter
51:35
into the classroom across both of our
51:38
institutions
51:40
cool that's great thank you
51:43
um i have a question for james and david
51:47
how do you discuss the connection
51:49
between content concept and process with
51:52
your students
51:54
hey go ahead
51:57
that's a big question it is a good
52:01
question and it has a sort of
52:03
hard to parse out answers like
52:06
the short version is it depends but it
52:09
requires a lot of exploration
52:11
and experimentation um like
52:14
uh i don't know if you all can see it in
52:16
this moment but the piece that's behind
52:18
betsy when she
52:19
talks is morgan's soft sculpture
52:22
she it took her a long time to get to
52:24
that
52:26
experimenting with a long time ways to
52:28
approach
52:29
the concept that she was after she
52:31
started with
52:33
relatively traditional uh
52:36
inkjet prints made out of shots in the
52:38
lighting studio
52:39
that were roughly 11 by 14 and
52:43
obviously came to a very very different
52:45
conclusion by the end
52:47
but it's a constant back and forth have
52:49
you tried this what about this
52:50
if it's supposed to be about that why is
52:52
it just this way
52:54
um and so that of course makes it a very
52:57
individual
52:58
process there's no it's not like
53:01
here's your uh family dynamics process
53:05
take that one and here's your body image
53:07
process and you take that one and your
53:09
yeah your landscape you cannot make art
53:12
with the bullet
53:13
points and then go check check check you
53:14
know it doesn't work that way
53:16
i mean you know you said you talked
53:17
about morgan's piece but
53:19
before what you said she went she went
53:21
to studio she was
53:22
going out and taking photograph of
53:24
estate sale
53:26
and you know taking photographs of wall
53:30
uh wallpaper old wallpapers and all that
53:34
and now
53:35
you know i can see that kind of floor uh
53:38
patterns
53:39
in her work incorporated that into you
53:42
know this
53:42
the final pro project but it's just
53:46
iteration of all that and then they get
53:49
they don't know that when they are
53:51
working on it but then when
53:53
come all the way full and then reflect
53:56
back oh that's what it came from
53:58
i do that same thing you know so so
54:02
sometimes you just need to go out
54:03
blindly and take photograph and come
54:06
back and
54:07
you know assess what you have done and
54:10
then
54:11
and maybe political situation changes
54:13
and then you you get pissed off and you
54:15
want to
54:15
say something and that matches with what
54:19
you
54:20
came back with you know just wandering
54:22
around and taking a photograph
54:23
so so it's it's both
54:27
i mean it's not that you have the idea
54:29
and then you
54:30
just trying to visualize it it has to
54:33
both
54:33
handy and you know that's why it's fine
54:41
well said well said
54:44
um okay um
54:48
i don't have any more questions but
54:52
um i would i guess does anybody else
54:56
want to
54:56
say anything before we sign off this was
55:00
a wonderful
55:02
uh conversation i think james
55:05
i think i think i want ed to come back
55:10
ed i don't know it's gone
55:14
okay it might be gone yeah um
55:17
he's having that signature cocktail we
55:20
were talking about earlier
55:24
well i guess i just as sort of the
55:26
outsider of the group i just want to
55:28
again say
55:29
thank you um to all of you i think this
55:32
part of what i've learned through this
55:34
experience is that that art design is
55:36
still
55:37
being made is still being shared even in
55:40
these crazy crazy circumstances so
55:43
that ends up at least for me being a
55:44
really bright light in the middle of
55:46
everything else that that's happening
55:48
even with all of the logistical
55:50
challenges so
55:52
yeah and then i want it i want everybody
55:54
to
55:55
visit the space and then see
55:59
both shows and i want i want to say
56:02
thank you sarah
56:03
i mean i i just enjoy working with this
56:06
team i mean
56:07
you know david too and we
56:10
came up quickly we came up with some
56:13
magical stuff
56:14
i mean we have this book and it will be
56:17
available
56:18
in blue blur book probably soon but for
56:22
now
56:22
uh people who are in this show we are
56:26
sending you
56:27
a copy thank you
56:30
that's great thank you i'll stop on and
56:32
really quickly say
56:33
ongoing matter will also have um our
56:35
catalog available
56:37
uh on blurb probably in the next couple
56:39
weeks
56:41
great okay well um i just want to thank
56:45
everybody for participating and this was
56:47
a wonderful
56:48
conversation and thank you very much
56:53
thank you bye
56:56
have a great evening all right it's
57:10
friday